Bedwetting Alarms

Bedwetting Alarms

If you’re the parent of a bedwetting child or teen, chances are you’ve tried many approaches to try to stop the problem–maybe even bedwetting alarms. Did you know that natural chiropractic care can help?

Before we explain how let’s take a look at some of the conventional approaches taken to prevent bedwetting.

Hope After You’ve Tried It All

sleeping boyFrom waking your child before you go to bed, to withholding liquids after a certain hour, to providing rewards for dry nights, to different types of medication—you really have tried it all.

Maybe you’ve even tried another popular solution, a bedwetting alarm. Has it been successful? Did it work only for as long as your child used it, with little success in bringing about a permanent bedwetting cure when your child no longer used it?

Sound the Bedwetting Alarms for an All-Natural Alternative

Chiropractors have experience helping children and teenagers. They know about all the solutions that parents have tried, without success. They’ve listened to parents talk about their own experiences as bedwetting children and how they didn’t want their own children to experience all that goes along with it.

They know the pain, and they have a solution. And, although they can promise you and your child nothing, what they can do is let you read the testimonials from families who dealt with this same problem and children who faced these same challenges. For many of them, bedwetting is no longer an issue.

Chiropractors believe that many health conditions stem from a spinal misalignment that might have happened in a fall, a car or bicycle accident or another type of injury – even birth. A spinal misalignment can wreak havoc with your nervous system because it can interfere with the proper functioning of nerves that link the brain to the body in an elaborate communication network.

A chiropractor will carefully examine your child to determine where the disturbance is occurring in their spine. Once they’ve noted it, they’ll discuss with you how an adjustment can help. If you’re nervous, they’ll happily show you the amount of force used to adjust a child – most parents are genuinely surprised by how gentle it actually is.

Bedwetting Alarms: How Do they Work?

Most bedwetting alarms operate in fairly the same way. There is a moisture sensor that is inserted into or attached to your child’s underwear and an alarm that is worn on your child’s wrist or attached to his or her shoulder or bed. Some have a cord connecting these two pieces, while others are wireless.

When your child begins to urinate in their sleep, the moisture sensor detects this and sets off the alarm, which, in most cases, sounds similar to a smoke alarm. There are some bedwetting alarms on the market that allow you to record something with your own voice, to use instead of the alarm.

Bedwetting Alarms: Behavior Modification in Stages

A bedwetting alarm is a type of behavior modification device, but initially, at least, it requires quite a bit of participation on the parents’ part. There is quite a long period of conditioning involved before your child can successfully wake on their own, before the first drop of urine and the sounding of the bedwetting alarm.

These are the usual steps:

  • The child gets the bedwetting alarm and wears it to bed, as directed.
    When the bedwetting alarm sounds, the parent goes to the child’s room, wakes the child and walks them to the bathroom to finish urinating.
  • The parent does this every time the bedwetting alarm sounds, for approximately six weeks; after this, the child is expected to start to wake on their own, without any parental involvement.
  • Within 12 weeks, the child should be conditioned to wake up on their own to empty the bladder, without needing to use the bedwetting alarm.

Bedwetting Alarms: The Good, the Bad and the Bottom Line

The Good: Bedwetting alarms are certainly safer, and less expensive, than medications used to treat nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) in children and can be successful with children who do learn to wake up on their own after several weeks.

The Bad: For some children, the bedwetting alarm works only as long as they are using it. Some children receive no benefit whatsoever because they wet the bed prior to getting up, they never hear the alarm because they are such deep sleepers, or their parents expect the bedwetting child to work with the alarm on their own since bedwetting is the child’s problem.

The Bottom Line: Parental opinions on the use of bedwetting alarms differ based on the success rate they experience in keeping their child dry all night. For some it works; for others, it is simply a waste of money, so they soon revert to the, “He or she will grow out of it,” mindset. Some companies make huge promises and charge more money for bedwetting alarms that are available for a less expensive price in other stores or on other websites.

Bedwetting Alarms: How Do they Work?

Most bedwetting alarms operate in fairly the same way. There is a moisture sensor that is inserted into or attached to your child’s underwear and an alarm that is worn on your child’s wrist or attached to his or her shoulder or bed. Some have a cord connecting these two pieces, while others are wireless.

When your child begins to urinate in their sleep, the moisture sensor detects this and sets off the alarm, which, in most cases, sounds similar to a smoke alarm. There are some bedwetting alarms on the market that allow you to record something with your own voice, to use instead of the alarm.

Bedwetting Alarms: Behavior Modification in Stages

A bedwetting alarm is a type of behavior modification device, but initially, at least, it requires quite a bit of participation on the parents’ part. There is quite a long period of conditioning involved before your child can successfully wake on their own, before the first drop of urine and the sounding of the bedwetting alarm.

These are the usual steps:

  • The child gets the bedwetting alarm and wears it to bed, as directed.
    When the bedwetting alarm sounds, the parent goes to the child’s room, wakes the child and walks them to the bathroom to finish urinating.
  • The parent does this every time the bedwetting alarm sounds, for approximately six weeks; after this, the child is expected to start to wake on their own, without any parental involvement.
  • Within 12 weeks, the child should be conditioned to wake up on their own to empty the bladder, without needing to use the bedwetting alarm.

Bedwetting Alarms: The Good, the Bad and the Bottom Line

The Good: Bedwetting alarms are certainly safer, and less expensive, than medications used to treat nocturnal enuresis (bedwetting) in children and can be successful with children who do learn to wake up on their own after several weeks.

The Bad: For some children, the bedwetting alarm works only as long as they are using it. Some children receive no benefit whatsoever because they wet the bed prior to getting up, they never hear the alarm because they are such deep sleepers, or their parents expect the bedwetting child to work with the alarm on their own since bedwetting is the child’s problem.

The Bottom Line: Parental opinions on the use of bedwetting alarms differ based on the success rate they experience in keeping their child dry all night. For some it works; for others, it is simply a waste of money, so they soon revert to the, “He or she will grow out of it,” mindset. Some companies make huge promises and charge more money for bedwetting alarms that are available for a less expensive price in other stores or on other websites.

Discover a Natural Solution Today

Chiropractors don’t claim that they have the ability to treat or “cure” any illness. They only help the body to work better so it can heal itself!

A chiropractor near you can provide effective natural treatment for your child’s bedwetting. Visit our helpful directory to locate a chiropractor in your city.

Choose natural. Choose chiropractic.

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